Access Specifiers Interview Questions

For an outer class we can only use 'public' and 'default' access specifiers. We can use 'private' access specifier for an inner class.
No, we cannot reduce the accessibility of an inherited or overridden method.
  • Private - The code defined within a 'private' access specifier is not accessible outside the object scope.
  • Public - The code defined within a 'public' access specifier is accessible from anywhere.
  • Default - The code defined within a 'default' access specifier is accessible from anywhere within the same package.
  • Protected - The code defined within a 'default' access specifier is accessible by object and the sub class objects.
No, we cannot reduce the accessibility of the overridden method.
We won't be able to create the objects directly by invoking a new operator by making a constructor private.
No, we cannot instantiate the object of derived class if parent constructor is protected.
No. An abstract method can only be declared 'protected' or 'public'.
It is used to explicitly mention the way how the data (variables and methods of a class) will be available outside the scope. An access specifier is something which mentions the way how the member of a class will be made available to anything outside the class. An access specifier cannot be used with the local variables(i.e. present inside method/scope). Access specifiers are the keywords using which we can control the accessibility of the members of a class.